Your Pet Stories

Send us your pet stories! We will be happy to include them on this page.

If you would like your pet to feature in this section of our website, please send us a photograph of your pet and tell us what they have been up to. Please email your photos and stories to Liz La-Page

ARCHIVED PET STORIES FROM 2014
ARCHIVED PET STORIES FROM 2013
ARCHIVED PET STORIES FROM 2012


Frankie - SUMMER 2015!

Frankie is a Labrador x Poodle who is just over a year old. His owner brought him into our Kemsing branch to see Natalie as he was off his food and had episodes of vomiting and diarrhoea. On examination nothing remarkable was found except that Frankie was dribbling lots. Natalie discussed the options with his owners and it was elected that symptomatic treatment would be initially trialled. Therefore, Natalie administered anti-sickness medication and it was advised to starve him for 24 hours and then begin feeding him little and often. Natalie advised to re-examine Frankie within 24-48hours or sooner if they were concerned.

The next day, Frankie had no more episodes of vomiting but his owner reported that he was now very lethargic. It was advised that Frankie came into the Dunton Green surgery for further investigation. On presentation, he was extremely dull with laboured breathing. His gums also displayed abnormal haemorrhages on both sides of his mouth. Frankie was not known to be a scavenger and was up to date with all his preventative care, therefore we were very concerned with the cause of his sudden illness. He was placed onto intravenous fluids and bloods were taken, which showed azotaemia (abnormally high levels of urea and creatinine). Blood was also sent away to an external laboratory for a specific test, testing adrenal function. X-rays and ultrasound scans were taken with no obvious findings. Due to the unknown cause and his guarded prognosis, treatments for all possible causes were started. Overnight, Frankie was transferred to Pennards Vets our emergency vets for intensive nursing care.

At Pennards, Frankie was very unstable and needed his electrolytes constantly checked. Due to his episodes of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar levels) he was placed onto a drip which contained glucose, as hypoglycaemia is a life threatening medical emergency that can lead to seizures and even death.

The next day back at Elands, regular blood glucose tests were taken throughout the day and showed very low readings. Intravenous glucose was given at these times to increase his glucose levels, as well as placing honey on his gums to increase his chances of reaching a normal level. Frankie was also hyperkalaemic (increased potassium in the blood) but fortunately his urea and creatinine levels reached normal ranges. The ups and downs of his blood levels continued to baffle us all!

Due to his constant changes in his electrolyte levels and his general instability Becky decided to refer him to the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) for constant monitoring.

During his time at the RVC Frankie’s blood results came back to reveal that he had a rare endocrine disorder known as Addison’s disease (hypoadrenocorticism). This disease is a condition where the body does not produce enough of its own hormones, such as cortisol. With a final diagnosis now being found, Frankie could be treated accordingly and was returned to his owner where he could start to recover from his ordeal. Frankie is now on long term medical treatment to stabilise his condition. As well as this Frankie will need regular checkups with our Vets to ensure the treatment is working correctly.

Despite Frankie’s severe and sudden deterioration, he was very determined to keep up with the tail wags. At his lowest points, and we mean literally being flat on the floor with no energy... he would still try his best! He is such a big friendly giant and we are all so happy that he is on the mend!


Honey - SPRING 2015!

Honey is a 4 year old Labrador x Poodle with an angelic face but one that got herself into a lot of trouble! Honey was rushed into Elands by her owner who had carried her an extremely long way when she started bleeding profusely from a wound whilst exploring the unknown a bit too frantically whilst on a walk.

When she was seen by Becky, the wound that was located near her groin was bleeding very heavily and Becky was concerned that there may be damage to her femoral artery (a large important artery that supplies blood to the hind limbs). She had very pale mucous membranes (due to the blood loss) and a very high heart rate- we suspected Honey was going into shock. Pressure was applied immediately to the wound and she was placed onto intravenous fluids to support her. When the bleeding was under control the wound was cleaned gently and a pressure bandage was applied. We continued fluids and gave her antibiotics and pain relief.

Honey was taken to Pennards Vets, our out of hours surgery for intensive care nursing. Whilst she was there they performed an ultrasound scan and x-rays to rule out penetration of her abdomen- luckily for Honey, no abdominal damage was seen. Honey returned to us the next morning where we immediately checked her vital signs- her mucous membranes were still pale so this was monitored closely throughout the day, along with her blood pressure. However, there was no further bleeding just severe bruising around the wound, so the wound was cleaned and redressed.

From close monitoring, it was apparent that Honey was not recovering from the blood loss as well as we had hoped and she would not be stable enough for surgery. Both Becky and Luca agreed that she would need a blood transfusion, so she was referred to the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) immediately.

Honey’s blood transfusion was successful and her wound was operated on. She came back to Elands for a check up and Becky removed her sutures. Honey appeared very happy and has returned to her jolly self! During her life threatening experience, Honey was such a co operative patient that handled constant monitoring so well, even managing the occasional wag of her tail- despite her lack of blood! Well done Honey!

Another ‘Thank you’ needs to be given to her Dad and family for acting so quickly and saving Honey’s life!